Chlorine and potassium iodide ionic equation

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chlorine and potassium iodide ionic equation

Elements and Compounds. Chlorine and potassium iodide balanced equation?

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Wiki User Asked in Elements and Compounds What is the balanced symbol equation between chlorine and potassium iodide? Asked in Elements and Compounds How do I Write the balanced equation in which potassium iodide reacts with chlorine to form potassium chloride and iodine? Asked in Elements and Compounds What is the balanced equation for silver nitrate and potassium iodide? Asked in Elements and Compounds Balanced equation for silver nitrate plus potassium iodide to form silver iodide plus potassium nitrate?

Asked in Chemistry What is the balanced equation of barium acetate and potassium iodide? A reaction doesn't occur. Asked in Elements and Compounds What is the balanced equation between chlorine and ammonium iodide? Asked in Elements and Compounds What is the balanced equation for lead acetate and potassium iodide producing potassium acetate and lead iodide?

Asked in Chemical Equations What is the balanced equation for hydrochloric acid and potassium iodide? There is no reaction. Asked in Elements and Compounds What is the Balanced symbol equation between fluorine and potassium iodide?

Chlorine and potassium iodide

Asked in Elements and Compounds What would the balanced equation be for potassium iodide and lead II nitrates to produce potassium nitrate and lead iodidine? Asked in Elements and Compounds Balanced chemical formula for What happens when chlorine gas is added to potassium iodide solution? Asked in Elements and Compounds What is the balanced equation of potassium iodide and calcium nitrate? Asked in Elements and Compounds, Chemical Equations What is the chemical equation of chlorine reacts with a sodium iodide?

Asked in Elements and Compounds, Metal and Alloys Is potassium chloride and potassium iodide the same? No, they are different, potassium chloride is what you get when you react potassium and chlorine, and potassuim iodide is what you get when you mix potassium and iodine. Asked in Elements and Compounds What is the Balanced equation for lead nitrate plus potassium iodide? Asked in Chemistry, Elements and Compounds What is the balanced half equation for bromine and potassium iodide?What is the equation for the reaction with chlorine and potassium bromide?

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chlorine and potassium iodide ionic equation

Wiki User Related Questions Asked in Elements and Compounds What is the name of the reaction of potassium bromide with chlorine?

This is a halogen single replacement reaction, in which the more active chlorine will take the place of the bromine in the potassium bromide.

Asked in Chemistry, Elements and Compounds Why does chlorine react with aqueous potassium bromide does not react with aqueous potassium chloride? Asked in Elements and Compounds What is the balanced equation form of potassium bromide and chlorine to form potassium chloride and bromine? Asked in Elements and Compounds What is the word equation for the reaction bromine and potassium iodide?

Bromine and Potassium iodide react to form Potassium bromide and Iodine. Asked in Elements and Compounds What is the Reaction between fluorine and potassium bromide? Asked in Elements and Compounds Which product of the reaction Chlorine plus Potassium bromide is a salt? The potassium chloride KCl is a salt. Asked in Chemistry What is the word equation for the reaction between silver nitrate and potassium bromide? Asked in Chemistry What type of the reaction is cl2 2kbr2kcl br2?

The reaction of chlorine with potassium bromide is a reduction-oxidation reaction. The chloride oxidizes bromide ions to molecular bromine, and itself is reduced to chloride ions. Asked in Chemistry How does potassium bromide react with other elements? Asked in Elements and Compounds, Chemical Equations What is the balanced chemical equation for the reaction of chlorine with sodium bromide solution?

There isn't one, this is a non-reaction. Asked in Metal and Alloys What are the products of the reaction between magnesium bromide and potassium acetate? Potassium bromide and Magnesium Acetate.These notes were written for the old IB syllabus The new IB syllabus for first examinations can be accessed by clicking the link below. IB syllabus for first examinations To work out what is going on in a chemical reaction which involves redox we first need to identify the oxidation states of the species on either side of the reaction.

Once this is done we can deduce how many electrons have been transferred and produce half-equations. For example:In the reaction between chlorine and potassium iodide solution the products are iodine and potassium chloride solution. We can write an equation for the reaction:. The chlorine atoms start off in the zero oxidation state elementbut after the reaction they are now in the -I oxidation state the chloride ion.

This means that each chlorine atom has gained one electron. We can write the half equation:. Now the iodine species start off as iodide ions and end up as iodine element.

The change in oxidation state is from -I to zero. The balancing of equations for reactions in alkaline solution will not be assessed. Redox equations are constructed from half equations showing the reduction or oxidation of the species involved. By convention electrode potential half equations are written as reductions - electrons are added to the species being reduced on the left hand side of the equation:. Writing down the half equations in the correct form reduction for copper and oxidation for zinc.

We check to make sure that the electrons are balanced. In this case they are, and the equations can be added together directly. If the number of electrons on both sides are different then the half equations must be multiplied through by appropriate quantities to balance the number of electrons on both sides. These are the chemicals that cause the oxidation in a redox reaction. We call the reacting compounds in a reaction the reagents short form of the words reacting agents.

We consider that the removal of electrons from a species is oxidation and these electrons have to be taken away by another compound or species. This species that attracts the electrons is said to be the oxidising agent i.

Similarly the reagent that causes reduction in a redox reaction is said to be the reducing agent. The oxidising agent takes the electron and is itself reduced, the reducing agent loses the electrons and is itself oxidised. The first stage in identifying the oxidising and reducing agents in a redox reaction is to assign oxidation numbers states to the species in the reactant and the products.

The species that loses electrons is oxidised and this is caused by the species that gains the electrons. Hence the species gaining the electrons is the oxidising agent. The chlorine atoms start off in the zero oxidation state elementbut after the reaction they are now in the -I oxidation state the chloride ion This means that each chlorine atom has gained one electron.

Balancing redox equations Redox equations are constructed from half equations showing the reduction or oxidation of the species involved. Reducing agents Similarly the reagent that causes reduction in a redox reaction is said to be the reducing agent.

By the same logic the species losing the electrons is the reducing agent. The oxidising agent gets reduced The reducing agent gets oxidised.This page explains how to work out electron-half-reactions for oxidation and reduction processes, and then how to combine them to give the overall ionic equation for a redox reaction.

This is an important skill in inorganic chemistry. Don't worry if it seems to take you a long time in the early stages. It is a fairly slow process even with experience. Take your time and practise as much as you can. This topic is awkward enough anyway without having to worry about state symbols as well as everything else.

Practice getting the equations right, and then add the state symbols in afterwards if your examiners are likely to want them. How do you know whether your examiners will want you to include them? The best way is to look at their mark schemes.

You should be able to get these from your examiners' website. There are links on the syllabuses page for students studying for UK-based exams. You can split the ionic equation into two parts, and look at it from the point of view of the magnesium and of the copper II ions separately. This shows clearly that the magnesium has lost two electrons, and the copper II ions have gained them.

These two equations are described as "electron-half-equations" or "half-equations" or "ionic-half-equations" or "half-reactions" - lots of variations all meaning exactly the same thing! Any redox reaction is made up of two half-reactions: in one of them electrons are being lost an oxidation process and in the other one those electrons are being gained a reduction process. In the example above, we've got at the electron-half-equations by starting from the ionic equation and extracting the individual half-reactions from it.

That's doing everything entirely the wrong way round! In reality, you almost always start from the electron-half-equations and use them to build the ionic equation. In the process, the chlorine is reduced to chloride ions. You would have to know this, or be told it by an examiner.

In building equations, there is quite a lot that you can work out as you go along, but you have to have somewhere to start from! You start by writing down what you know for each of the half-reactions. In the chlorine case, you know that chlorine as molecules turns into chloride ions:. If you forget to do this, everything else that you do afterwards is a complete waste of time!

chlorine and potassium iodide ionic equation

The left-hand side of the equation has no charge, but the right-hand side carries 2 negative charges. That's easily put right by adding two electrons to the left-hand side. The final version of the half-reaction is:. Now you repeat this for the iron II ions. You know or are told that they are oxidised to iron III ions.

Write this down:. The atoms balance, but the charges don't. There are 3 positive charges on the right-hand side, but only 2 on the left. You need to reduce the number of positive charges on the right-hand side. That's easily done by adding an electron to that side:. It is obvious that the iron reaction will have to happen twice for every chlorine molecule that reacts. Allow for that, and then add the two half-equations together. But don't stop there!! Check that everything balances - atoms and charges.

It is very easy to make small mistakes, especially if you are trying to multiply and add up more complicated equations. You will notice that I haven't bothered to include the electrons in the added-up version.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service.

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What Is The Total Ionic Equation For Potassium Iodide + Chlorine Potassium Chloride + Iodine?

From my understanding, since none of the products nor any of the reactants is aqueous, there shouldn't be a net ionic equation. However, my friend has proceeded with the problem as follows:. Technically you are correct. How can there be any ions when the reactants are not in aqueous medium? But here it is a matter of convention and maybe an illustration of how to write the ionic equations from molecular ones.

Likewise, if you have done balancing of redox reactionsyou might notice half of the reactions given to balance are completely impossible according to the laws of chemical combination. You'll always be at a loss when you overthink in chemistry, even if your argument is right. Taking it as just a convention would be a better idea.

Sign up to join this community. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top. Home Questions Tags Users Unanswered. What is the net ionic equation for rection of liquid bromide with sodium iodide crystals? Ask Question. Asked 6 years, 7 months ago. Active 2 years, 1 month ago. Viewed 4k times. Could somebody explain which one of us is correct and why?

What is the ionic equation for this reaction?

Mithoron 4, 8 8 gold badges 32 32 silver badges 49 49 bronze badges. As for how the net ionic equation should be written, I think it's a matter of convention. This is a redox reaction, and sodium is not undergoing change in oxidation state, so that seems right to me. Hopefully somebody weighs in with a conclusive answer as to what the convention is. Aug 21 '13 at Active Oldest Votes.Download Our Learning App.

During an experiment, chlorine gas was bubbled into a solution of potassium iodide a State the observations made b Using an ionic equation, explain why the reaction is redox. A chloride dissolves in water to form an electrolyte while the same chloride dissolves in methylbenzene to form a non-electrolyte View More Chemistry Questions and Answers Return to Questions Index. Hydrogen chloride gas can be prepared by reacting sodium chloride with an acid.

Date posted: February 10, Answers 1. State and explain what would happen if a dry red litmus paper was dropped in a gas jar dry chlorine. By using only dilute hydrochloric acid, describe how a student would distinguish between barium sulphite from barium sulphate.

State and explain what would happen if a dry litmus paper was dropped in a gas jar of chlorine. Name the conditions under which sodium hydroxide reacts with chlorine to form sodium hypochlorite.

During a class experiment, chlorine gas was bubbled into a solution of potassium iodide a State the observations made. Two reagents that can be used to prepare chlorine gas are manganese IV oxide and concentrated hydrochloric acid i Write an equation for the reaction ii Give the formula of another reagent that can be reacted with concentrated hydrochloric acid to produce chlorine gas iii Describe how the chlorine gas could be dried in the laboratory.

Name the process which takes place when: a Solid carbon IV oxide dry ice changes directly into gas b A red litmus paper turns white when dropped into chlorine water. Quick Links.The reactivity of the halogens — the Group 7 elements - decreases as you move down the group.

This can be shown by looking at displacement reactions. When chlorine as a gas or dissolved in water is added to sodium bromide solution, the chlorine takes the place of the bromine.

Because chlorine is more reactive than bromine, it displaces bromine from sodium bromide.

chlorine and potassium iodide ionic equation

The solution turns brown. This brown colour is the displaced bromine. The chlorine has gone to form sodium chloride. In this equation, the Cl and Br have swapped places:. This type of reaction happens with all the halogens. A more reactive halogen displaces a less reactive halogen from a solution of one of its salts. If you test different combinations of the halogens and their salts, you can work out a reactivity series for Group The slideshow shows what happens when chlorine, bromine and iodine are added to various halogen salts:.

Adding chlorine, bromine and iodine to halogen salts. Chlorine water is added to three solutions. The result of adding chlorine to the three solutions. Bromine water is added to three solutions. The result of adding bromine to the three solutions. Iodine water is added to three solutions. The result of adding iodine to the three solutions.

Redox reactions involve both oxidation loss of electrons and reduction gain of electrons. Halogen displacement reactions are redox reactions because the halogens gain electrons and the halide ions lose electrons. When we consider one of the displacement reactions, we can see which element is being oxidised and which is being reduced. We can see that the bromine has gained electrons, so it has been reduced.

The iodide ions have lost electrons, so they have been oxidised. Halogen displacement reactions The reactivity of the halogens — the Group 7 elements - decreases as you move down the group. Example When chlorine as a gas or dissolved in water is added to sodium bromide solution, the chlorine takes the place of the bromine.

The slideshow shows what happens when chlorine, bromine and iodine are added to various halogen salts: previous.


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